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  • #2783
    MikeyWrites
    • Topics - 3
    • Replies - 10
    • Newbie

    The Classic Car Club of America gave me three assignments about classic car insurance on Textbroker today and I’d like an opinion. This is one, but they’re all about the same, with more about what a classic car actually is on the other two. These were a nickel a word on their end. I took home 3.7 cents. Planning on raising my side to 5 cents on the first of Jan. These had a big pile of keywords with them. Just curious what you guys think.

    ≠===================

    How Much Is Classic Car Insurance?

    When a classic car glides past, time itself seems to slow down, encapsulating that one perfect moment. The long, sleek hood, graceful curves, handcrafted leather and solid metal parts dripping in mirror-polished chrome signal a genuine work of art to even the most casual observer.

    Then it slowly rolls by, scarves and hats waving. Spokes and headlights gleam with an assured air of self-confidence as it suddenly fades away, engine burbling a magic tone. Once it’s gone, the world of busy noise returns with a sense of loss and you simply must find another. Maybe you’d like to make one of these collector machines your very own.

    What Makes A Car A Classic

    The Oxford English Dictionary defines a classic as a perfect example of its type. Classic cars were made between 1915 and 1948, usually at the high end of the market, made in limited numbers and are “fine” or “distinctive” examples of their type, according to the Classic Car Club of America or CCCA.

    This isn’t the only definition for such a vehicle and other clubs as well as insurers and car enthusiasts often have their own definitions. However, the CCCA should be considered an authority as one of the oldest and most popular clubs for classics.

    Most of the cars on the CCCA list of approved classics are familiar models to fans of historic automobiles, including undisputed masterpieces like the 1930 Cadillac V16, every single Duesenberg that rolled out of Auburn and naturally, every Rolls-Royce and Bentley built between 1915 and 1948.

    However, there are more than a few beauties approved that might seem surprisingly ordinary to the very same enthusiasts. The list includes many Buicks, Chryslers and Studebakers, proving that not everyone needs to be an oil tycoon to own a genuine classic car and join the club.

    These are not average models of these brands of course, but some can be quite affordable and aren’t nearly as limited in numbers as some of the more exclusive makes already mentioned. The beauty of cars like these is that it doesn’t take a career’s worth of income to repair minor damage and they can be driven by people of average means from time to time.

    Even with those very special cars that do take a career’s worth of income to purchase, it doesn’t need to cost a fortune to protect that treasure for mechanical repairs, maintenance and paint restoration. Classic car insurers offer policies with coverage for all of these types of routine mishaps and even claims for the complete cost of vehicle replacement are available for the low price of monthly premiums.

    What Are the Requirements for Classic Car Insurance?

    Classic car insurers don’t all have the same requirements to qualify your car for coverage. Most don’t use the same strict criteria as the CCCA. Some insurers have different types of policies for old cars with designations such as antique, vintage, collector or historic policies that depend on age and use.

    Some of the more common restrictions include:

    * The car must be an older model of a certain age.
    * There are often limits on the number of annual claims.
    * Storage requirements to protect the car in a locked, weather tight garage.
    * Sometimes liability coverage is required in separate premiums.
    * The vehicle must be operable and in good condition.
    * There are usually restrictions on the miles driven annually.

    Does classic car insurance cost more than regular insurance?

    Actually, average quotes for collector policies run at a 40 percent discount over regular insurance. Insurers sometimes offer a further discount if a car in exceptional condition is kept in storage with humidity and climate controls or has extraordinary security like GPS tracking and cameras.

    Shopping different companies is a must with very valuable or extremely rare automobiles because in some cases a company places upper limits on the cash values of claims in the fine print. Always ask about such upper limits. As mentioned earlier, some quotes won’t include liability as part of the policy. Always check this with your agent before driving the automobile. Be prepared to document the condition and value of the car with invoices, appraisals and photos or video.

    Insuring a collector car doesn’t have to be an expensive proposition. With a little bit of care, some knowledge and some shopping around, it’s easily possible to insure a valuable collector car for around half the cost of a new car. The next time the world goes into slow motion, it could be you rolling past, providing that perfect moment for some other lucky bystander.

     

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    #2786
    SARubin
    • Topics - 73
    • Replies - 99
    • Wordsmith
    • ★★★

    Good stuff, Mike –

    The only thing that confused me was the opening title…

    How Much Is Classic Car Insurance?

    When I read it I expected to immediately start learning about “classic car insurance” but you don’t mention insurance until 2/3 of the way down the page? At the beginning that left me a little unsure of where you were going with this article.

    A clearer title could be

    What Makes A Car A Classic and How Much Is Classic Car Insurance?

    At least this way, as I read the first few paragraphs, I have a better idea where you’re taking me with your story.

     

    If you can’t change the title because of space restrictions, or main keyword SEO requirements, then perhaps a transition sentence or two for your opening?

    Something along the lines of…

    How Much Is Classic Car Insurance?

    Classic car insurance is not the first thing that most people want to think about when they see a classic car. For a true classic car enthusiast, when a classic car glides past, time itself seems to slow down, encapsulating that one perfect moment. The long, sleek hood, graceful curves…

     

    At least this way you mention insurance in the opening, so I know it’s part of what you’re going to talk about.

    The only other thing is… I would make the sub-heads bold so your skimmers can get a quick overview of what your article covers. Plus it helps to break up the page for easier reading.

     

    Other than that, it looks pretty good.

     

    A good marketer knows how to think like a marketer - A great marketer learns how to think like the customer...
    SARubin - Direct Response Copywriter / Conversion Rate Optimizer

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    #2787
    MikeyWrites
    • Topics - 3
    • Replies - 10
    • Newbie

    Those are great points.

    I actually feel the same, but some of the directions I get with these things are incredibly micromanaged. One article was actually named “What Makes a Car a Classic?” and it also had a  brief mention of insurance further down. This one will link to that one on their site. I think there’s probably going to be a bunch more of these coming along.

    With the headings, I always want to bold them or go with H2, but Textbroker is explicit that those things are determined by the customer. I always suggest them, but a lot of this stuff goes to web guys who charge their clients by the task and want to add the coding themselves. So this would be just a raw text file that he’s going to work with to create their web pages. The links are done as html tags the way the customer receives them, instead of just being links like shown here.

    The titles for the subheaders and the order in which they appeared were dictated by the customer in this case. All I really did was figure out how to fit the keywords in and make some really dry stuff manageable to read, especially since TB has an absolute requirement to adhere to the AP Stylebook. I can’t understand that about all these content mills. This surely ain’t no journalism and I ain’t no newspaper guy.

    Thanks for the look over. I expect to be done slaving in the Textbroker salt mine by spring. I’m going to start pitching direct to magazines and major sites. I’ve actually seen things I wrote for less than ten bucks showing up on Forbes, Fast Company and other sites. If these clients can sell my stuff to places like that, then so can I.

    For any somewhat newbies that are reading this, I STRONGLY suggest you don’t bother with Textbroker or similar sites. The standard pay on the open order board is 1.4 cents, and that’s only if you’re a nearly perfect writer. My strategy is to pick likely clients off the open board, do fantastic work on a short order and they usually contact me later for a direct order rather than take their chances on the open order pool.

    They do have a lot of learning resources and the editors are great, but require strict adherence to the AP Stylebook which is a major pain in the ass when it comes to making something good to read.

    By the way, this is the list of keywords for this order. The other two were similar.

    coverage (Required density: 2-5 times)

    vehicle (Required density: 2-5 times)

    cars (Required density: 2-5 times)

    collector (Required density: 3-5 times)

    policies (Required density: 2-5 times)

    claims (Required density: 3-5 times)

    insurers (Required density: 4-8 times)

    quotes (Required density: 2-5 times)

    storage (Required density: 2-5 times)

    liability (Required density: 2-5 times)

    protect (Required density: 2-5 times)

    condition (Required density: 2-5 times)

    discount (Required density: 2-5 times)

    premiums (Required density: 2-5 times)

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    #2789
    SARubin
    • Topics - 73
    • Replies - 99
    • Wordsmith
    • ★★★

    Yeah, they do seem to micromanage their writers a bit. And pay them pennies (literally)

    You’ve just given me one more reason to not be a big fan of those freelance farms (aka content mills).

    But I do understand why many writers use them. If someone is looking for work then I guess that’s one place to find it?

    I personally prefer to work directly, one-on-one, with clients. That way there’s no middle man mucking up the communication between me and the person who’s actually paying for the work.

     

    A good marketer knows how to think like a marketer - A great marketer learns how to think like the customer...
    SARubin - Direct Response Copywriter / Conversion Rate Optimizer

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    #2797
    Rhonda
    • Topics - 1
    • Replies - 21
    • Member
    • ★★

    @MikeyWrites

    Even though I’m not in your target market, the content itself looks good to me.

    Out of curiosity, do you use any tools such as Grammarly, Flesch–Kincaid, or Hemingway app to double check your articles for readability?

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